Education Academic Presents at Self-Study of Teacher Education Practices ConferenceGeneral

Delegates at the 11th International Conference on Self-Study of Teacher Education Practices held at Herstmonceux Castle, East Sussex, England.Delegates at the 11th International Conference on Self-Study of Teacher Education Practices held at Herstmonceux Castle, East Sussex, England.

Senior Lecturer in the School of Education, Dr Kathleen Pithouse-Morgan recently presented two papers at the 11th International Conference on Self-Study of Teacher Education Practices held at Herstmonceux Castle, East Sussex, England.

The theme for the 2016 conference was: “Enacting self-study as methodology for professional inquiry” and it was organised by the Self-Study of Teacher Education Practices (S-STEP) Special Interest Group (SIG) of the American Educational Research Association (AERA). S-STEP is one of the largest special interest groups of AERA.

‘Since 1996, members of the international self-study research community have met every two years for a conference at the Queen’s University International Study Centre at Herstmonceux Castle,’ said Dr Pithouse-Morgan.

Continuing, she said, ‘Twice as many conference proposals were submitted than were finally accepted. Each paper was blind peer-reviewed in a rigorous two-step peer-review process. Papers were presented by self-study researchers from Australia, Canada, Chile, the Czech Republic, Iceland, India, Ireland, Israel, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Singapore, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States of America (USA).’

Dr Pithouse-Morgan’s papers were co-authored with self-study researchers from Agnes Scott College (USA), the Durban University of Technology, George Mason University (USA), Montclair State University (USA), and Walter Sisulu University. The papers explored methodological inventiveness in self-study research through the arts-based methods of drawing, dance and poetry.

The co-authored papers further illustrated how scholarly conversations across specialisations, institutions, and continents can generate transformative possibilities for university educators and leaders imagining pedagogies and collaboration in new ways.

Dr Pithouse-Morgan is the current lead investigator of the South African Transformative Education/al Studies (TES) project, which aims to develop self-study research capacity in a transdisciplinary, multi-institutional professional learning community.

She is lead editor of two books on transdisciplinary self-study research: Making Connections: Self-Study & Social Action (Pithouse, Mitchell, & Moletsane, 2009) and Polyvocal Professional Learning through Self-Study Research (Pithouse-Morgan & Samaras, 2015). She served as secretary of the S-STEP SIG of the AERA for 2012-2014 and is the convenor of the Self-Reflexive Research Methodologies SIG of the South African Educational Research Association (SAERA).

The collective wisdom offered by the conference papers can be accessed online at http://tinyurl.com/zgosg5x.

 

Melissa Mungroo