Sexual intercourse between young women and older men under spotlight at International AIDS pre-conferenceHealth Sciences

Professor Beverley Haddad presenting at the workshop.Professor Beverley Haddad presenting at the workshop.

 

A workshop titled: “Sugar Daddies and HIV: Religion as a Resource for Social Change” was presented in Durban at the HIV Interfaith pre-conference: “Faith on the Fast Track”.

The workshop was organised by the Ujamaa Centre for Social Research and Development and the Collaborative for HIV and AIDS, Religion and Theology (CHART), based within the School of Religion, Philosophy and Classics, in the College of Humanities.

The event, attended by 65 people, focused on age disparate sex between young women between the ages of 15-24 and older men. Age disparate sex has been shown to substantially increase the vulnerability of young women to contracting HIV, and so the workshop explored how religion could be used as a resource for social change within this key population.

Professor Gerald West of the Ujamaa Centre showed how the Contextual Bible Study method could be used to provide a safe space for young women to explore and discuss their risky sexual behaviour.

Ms Bongi Zengele, also of the Ujamaa Centre, spoke about her experience of working with young women in communities and how this experience had influenced the structure of this methodology.

The workshop heard from Professor Beverley Haddad of CHART about the latest research findings on age disparate sex. 

The workshop stimulated further discussion as to how this issue could be taken up within faith communities, a strategy which could ultimately contribute to the mitigation of new HIV infections among young women.

 

chart@ukzn.ac.za